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PA SHRM Leadership

Our annual FREE training will be held in Gettysburg on August 2nd. This event is open to all chapter board members & has been awarded 2.5 HR (General) HRCI credits!  Click here to register.


State Conference

Our annual PA SHRM State Conference is scheduled for September 18th & 19th at The Penn Stater. Click here to register.

Dr. Steve Robbins will be our key note speaker, click here for his bio. A list of conference topics & presenters is available here.

Interest in sponsoring this event? Click here!

For hotel reservations, please click here for discount codes and rates.

Join a Meet & Eat session the evening of Sept 18th, click here to register.


Future 2014 State Council Meetings:

August 1st 12pm
(Gettysburg)

 
Sept 17th  12pm
(State College) 

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PHILADELPHIA’S BAN THE BOX PLUS FEDERAL AND STATE LAWS TOO

On April 13, 2011, the Mayor of the City of Philadelphia signed an Ordinance entitled “Fair Criminal Record Screening Standards” which establishes requirements for the screening of criminal records by certain employers within the City of Philadelphia and limits an employer’s ability to consider arrests and convictions of job applicants.  The stated purpose of the legislation is to “give the individual with a criminal record an opportunity to be judged on his or her own merit during the submission of the application and at least until the completion of an interview.”

The Philadelphia Ordinance applies to city agencies and private employers of 10 or more people (employees) in the City of Philadelphia. However, even if an employer is covered by the Ordinance, it applies only to applicants who are applying for jobs in the City of Philadelphia.

The Ordinance makes it unlawful for an employer to make any inquiry about, to take any adverse action against any person on the basis of or to require any person to disclose or reveal any arrest or criminal accusation, not then pending, which did not result in a conviction.

The Ordinance goes a step further and limits the ability of an employer to consider even criminal convictions as part of the early stages of the application process.  The Philadelphia Ordinance makes it unlawful for employers in the City of Philadelphia to make any inquiry regarding or to require any person to disclose or reveal any criminal convictions during the application process, which begins when an applicant inquires about employment and ends when an employer has accepted an employment application.

What’s more, the employer cannot make an inquiry regarding or require a person to disclose or reveal any criminal convictions before and during the first interview either.  If the applicant voluntarily discloses any information regarding his or her criminal convictions at the interview, the employer may discuss the criminal conviction disclosed by the applicant.

The Ordinance becomes effective ninety days after it was signed into law, in other words, on July 13, 2011.

Violations of the Ordinance will carry a fine of up to $2,000 per violation.  Further, it is inevitable that violations of the Ordinance will be argued as the basis for wrongful failure to hire claims.

What This Means For Employers

Employers in Philadelphia will need to remove from their Applications for Employment any questions about criminal convictions (except where required by another law, in which case a separate application with an appropriate question consistent with the legal requirement must be developed for such applicants only).

Employers in Philadelphia who wish to inquire about criminal convictions will need to develop a criminal conviction inquiry form (focusing only on convictions) to give to applicants who have completed their first interview and to whom they wish to extend either a second interview or a job offer.

Employers in Philadelphia must consider not only the Fair Criminal Record Screening Standards Ordinance, but also the Pennsylvania Dissemination of Criminal History Records Information Act, which restricts when Pennsylvania employers can consider criminal convictions and includes notice requirements.

Further, both the EEOC and PHRC have released guidance which states that disqualifying applicants due to arrest or conviction records may have a disparate impact on certain racial and ethnic groups, and therefore, have suggested similar (but not identical) factors which should be considered before making any adverse employment decision upon a criminal record.

Employers need to be particularly careful of per se rules (for example, individuals with certain felonies are disqualified from employment for all jobs).  These rules maximize consistency but also may serve as the basis for class actions alleging disparate impact.

This article should not be construed as legal advice or as pertaining to specific factual situations.

 

 
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